Tuesday, August 17, 2010

Because There's Always Something.

Here is an example of why the world (read: my family) needs stay-at-home moms (or dads). And also an example of how, apparently, each school year there is going to be some crazy school-schedule aberration that creates complications in the drop-off, pick-up, bus stop, and/or childcare routine.

I just received an e-mail from Julia's elementary school principal reminding parents that this year, the school is switching to a new schedule wherein it begins one hour late every Wednesday, for teacher education. Unfortunately, this year Genevieve is in nursery school on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday mornings.

So, starting on Julia's SECOND DAY OF SCHOOL and Genevieve's PRESCHOOL ORIENTATION DAY (have I mentioned that Genevieve has separation anxiety and therefore her orientation day will be crucial?), I am supposed to be both waiting at the bus stop with Julia AND taking Genevieve into nursery school at the very same time. REPEAT EVERY WEDNESDAY FOR THE ENTIRETY OF THE SCHOOL YEAR.

Awesome!

3 comments:

Mommy Lisa said...

Sorry about that. :( That is like my step-kids school that did everything from school programs to parent-teacher conferences in the middle of the day. No option for working parents...nope. Middle of the day. sigh.

Mnmom said...

We're in a teenage version of that. How do you get:
2 working adults with multiple jobs
2 teens with jobs, sports, and other extras
and one 11-year-old with sports
all of which overlap each other,
all over town on time with only 2 cars? One of which is out-of-town from 7am until 6pm?

Mary S. said...

I'm really surprised the district continued this weird Wednesday program another year. It's very difficult for families at all stages. The high school version involved a one-hour late start last year, so for my daughter who was in a special choir, which had an early practice, it meant Tuesday she started school at 7:50 a.m., Wednesday at 8:50 a.m., and Thursday at 6:50 a.m. Very disruptive to the sleep patterns of everyone involved.